”Honor the Past; Deserve the Present“

Pvt. Arthur Sand

U. S. Army, 65th Coast Artillery Corps, First Army Division
(October 8, 1892 – May 2, 1930)

Contributor:  Dana Cronin

Background

  • Father's name was Carl Viktor Sand (4/20/1859-11/29/1931)
  • Mother's maiden name was Josephine Alberta Elm (9/10/1857-4/30/1935)
    • Both were born in Smoland, Sweden
  • Carl and Josephine had nine children
    • All children completed high school in Smoland
    • All children worked on the family farm
    • Family was poor

Emigration to U.S.

  • Seeking a better life, four brothers (Arthur, Linder, John, and Bernard) and three sisters (Alida, Gerda, and Agda) emigrated to the United States
    • Arthur worked at a forge in Chicago, Illinois
    • Linder worked at the Pullman Palace Car Company and then at International Harvester in Chicago
    • Bernard worked first for the Pullman Palace Car Company and later in a factory that made plastic products (e.g., toys and knives with plastic handles)
    • John worked at the Pullman Palace Car Company and then returned permanently to Sweden in 1926 to take over the farm from his father Carl (67 years of age in 1926)
    • Alida lived in Duluth, Minnesota, where she married and raised a family
    • Agda and Gerda lived in Chicago, Illinois, where they married and raised families

Military Experience

  • Arthur Sand registered for the draft on May 25, 1917
  • He enlisted in the Army
    • Note—Arthur's brother may also have enlisted in the Army [Russel Quirici, telephone conversation with Dana Cronin, 5 June 2012]
  • Basic training in San Diego, California
  • He was in the field artillery
    • Note—His uniform's left arm patch would indicate Battery D/F, 65th CAC (Coastal Artillery Corps)
      • Note—later patches included an image of a bear over the top portion of the patch
      • Note—65th CAC was made up mostly of men from the North Pacific Coast Artillery District, based in Seattle, Washington
      • Note—Most of the men in Batteries A and B came from Coast Defenses of San Diego
  • On front lines he was exposed to mustard gas
    • His face remained scarred from exposure to mustard gas [Alex Quirici, conversation with his grandmother (Arthur Sand's daughter) Vera Sand Quirici, 10 May 2010]

After the War

  • Resided at 10154 South State Street in Chicago, Illinois
  • Worked for a forge company as a hammer man

Marriage and Family

  • Married Emelia Nillsson on December 24, 1920, at the Zion Lutheran Church in Rockford, Illinois
    • Officiated by Rev. Carl Solomonson
    • Marriage certificate indicates Moline, Illinois, as residence for Arthur and Emelia
  • Arthur and Emelia had one child, a daughter, Vera, born in Chicago on March 30, 1924.
    • Vera married Oreste Quirici at the Zion Lutheran Church in Chicago, Illinois, on December 16, 1950
    • Oreste and Vera had four children—Darrell (b. 6/19/1959), Russell (12/12/1955), Kenneth (b. 10/4/1953), and Carolyn (b. 11/9/1951)
      • Darrell married Jill O'Leary on 4/24/1982, in Napa, California
      • Darrell and Jill have three children—Greg (b. 1987), Jeff (b. 1990), and Alex (b. 1994)

Death

  • Arthur Sand died of a brain tumor at age thirty-eight on May 2, 1930, at the University of Chicago Hospital in Chicago, Illinois
    • His exposure to mustard gas may have been the cause of the tumor [Alex Quirici, conversation with his grandmother (Arthur Sand's daughter) Vera Sand Quirici, 10 May 2010]
    • He was buried on May 5, 1930, in the Oak Hill cemetery in Worth, Illinois
  • Emelia had heart trouble and cancer, but she died due to a stroke at the St. Helena (California) Hospital on November 28, 1977 [Carolyn Quirici, telephone conversation with Dana Cronin, 5 June 2012; Russell Quirici, telephone conversation with Dana Cronin, 5 June 2012]
    • She is buried at the St. Helena (California) Cemetery
(rev.6.6.12)